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Computers in Libraries 2010 – Information Fluency: Literacy for Life

QR Code Brain Dump by Mark Sprague

During Computers in Libraries 2010 we used QR Codes as an easy way for attendees to grab the URL’s for the many bloggers at the conference. For some folks, this use of the two dimensional encoding squares was old hat, and for others it was their first time seeing this 16 year old technology in action.

Name that Blog?

After years of use in Asia, QR Codes use is increasing in the US as a direct result of widespread adoption of smart phones with bar code scanning capabilities like Android powered phones and the Apple iPhone. The simple codes we used are just the beginning of what QR Code technology can express. The code on the right provides a link to the website of one of the Bloggers@CIL2010 – if you don’t have a phone with a barcode scanner, you can use one of the free online decoders like this one from ZXing.

Mark Sprague has written a very comprehensive post outlining QR technology and its many extensions and uses. Some of the designer codes he showcases are very cool. There are even QR codes with embedded graphics or company logos. I’d like to also thank Paula Hane, one of the LibConf bloggers and News Bureau Chief at Information Today, Inc. for featuring Mark’s post on Facebook since that is where I first saw it.

Read it at Understanding QR Codes.

The #CIL2010 Tweet Notebook

Earlier today Karyn Silverman, aka @InfoWitch asked for suggestions on archiving all her Computers in Libraries 2010 tweets.   Kate, aka @itsjustkate wondered about the same thing since her method involved using print screen to get hers into reports.

@InfoWitch's Question

I was about to suggest to them both that they use the TwapperKeeper.com #CIL2010 archive when the alert that @InfoWitch’s export was ready.

While Twitter’s own internal search has improved overtime, its still best suited for small result sets and there are times when it is simply not available or working in a scaled back, near real-time mode.  Services like TwapperKeeper are great because they start gathering the archive the moment someone creates the Notebook.  In the case of #CIL2010, I create it around noon on December 16, 2009 so it has tweets with that hashtag going back to before the conference, and then through the conference, and right up to @InfoWitch’s request this morning.

Even if all you want are your own Tweets, the TwapperKeeper notebook is a good choice.  The Notebook may contain thousands of entries, but the downloaded version is in CSV format so its child’s play to apply a filter in Excel, Open Office, or Google Docs to limit the rows to your own.

If you are going to an event or just want to have easy access to an individual’s Tweets, just head over to TwapperKeeper.com and start a notebook.  One of my personal favorites is the @FakeAPStylebook notebook I created to ensure I didn’t miss any of their snarky gems.

JD Thomas
Tech Support Manager
Information Today, Inc.

Baldgeekinmd on Days Two and Three of CIL2010

Maurice Coleman of T is for Training podcast and (almost) Bald Trainer Blog sums up his second and third days at Computers in Libraries 2010 and this years offerings for teachers and trainers.

My Computers in Libraries experience tends to blur after the first full day of the conference, but here are some of my impressions from those last two days of the conference.  My conference tweets from CIL can be found at @confbaldgeek This is my happy recap of the last two days of the conference. …

At some point at CIL or right after CIL (2009),  a group of T is for Training folks discussed what changes we would love to see at the Computers In Libraries conference, including tracks that focused on Training/Learning.

Read on at Impressions of Day Two and Three of CIL2010 « (almost) Bald Trainer Blog

AOTUS on LOC Tweet Archive

David Ferrerio talks with (L) Jane Dysart and (R) Donna Scheeder

Computers in Libraries 2010 Keynote speaker, AOTUS David Ferriero posted in his blog on why the National Archives did not also acquire the Twitter archive.

Have you heard the news? This week, the Library of Congress announced that they are acquiring the digital archive of public tweets. On April 14, @librarycongress tweeted, “Library to acquire ENTIRE Twitter archives — All public tweets, ever, since March 2006!” Congratulations, Library of Congress.

via AOTUS: Collector in Chief » Tweets: What We Might Learn From Mundane Details..